Miami Midwinter
Coral Reef Yacht Club
Coconut Grove, Miami, Florida
March 11–12, 2003
Pos Bow# Sail # Crew R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 Total
1 24 15083 JEFF LINTON, AMY LINTON & MARK TAYLOR 5 4 11 1 7 28
2 23 14682 BILL HEALY, JOANN JONES & NICK MERCIER 20 1 4 11 2 38
3 28 15168 THOMAS ALLEN, JOHN HUMPHREY & VICKI MATTHEWS 13 17 2 4 4 40
4 4 15181 PHIL GROTHEER, GEOFF BECKER & BILL WARD 16 6 3 3 16 44
5 25 15125 JODY SWANSON, SKIP DIEBALL & TOM STARCK 10 20 12 6 3 51
6 15 15064 LARRY MacDONALD, ELLEN STARCK & DEBBIE PROBST 6 9 1 15 24\ZFP 55
7 17 14752 STEVE HAYDEN, BARR BATZER & JAMEY RABBIT 8 16 5 24 8 61
8 6 14794 CRISTOBAL PEREZ, CHRISTIAN PEREZ & FRANCISCO PEREZ 11 22 10 21 5 69
9 42 1437 BETSY ALISON, SUZY LEECH & LEE LEYDA 7 14 16 16 19 72
10 19 15119 DAVID STARCK, JOE STARCK & HEIDI THOMA 4 3 47\OCS 2 18 74
11 7 14951 DAVID PECK, NINA PECK & JONATHAN FARRAR 18 11 14 17 14 74
12 1 14900 JAMES CRANE, BRENDA CRANE & ROBERT CRANE 47\OCS 12 6 9 1 75
13 33 14855 RICHARD HALLAGAN, TAMMI JAMISON & HENDRIX TENEYCK 41 21 9 5 6 82
14 40 14740 W.G. FAUDE, ERNIE DIEBALL & JARED DRAKE 9 2 17 7 48\OCS 83
15 27 14688 BRIAN HAYES, GREG FISHER & KATHLEEN TOCKE 26 18 13 8 25 90
16 31 11011 TITO GONZALEZ, KLAUS ENGELL & JUAN PABLO del SOLAR 1 8 8 27 48\OCS 92
17 14 14709 JUAN REID, FERNANDO GALLYAS & FELIPE HERMAN 3 5 24 13 48\OCS 93
18 22 15122 JIM CARSON, JIMMY ROE & JARRETT LYNN 17 27 29 14 11 98
19 3 15103 STEVEN DAVIS, JAN DAVIS & TRAVIS MAIER 29 10 20 12 30 101
20 51 15151 FRANK ATKINSON, KURT TAULBEE & VALERIE HOLLY 2 13 47\OCS 18 23 103
21 21 14851 CHED PROCTOR, KATHRYN JOSENHANS & TODD JOHNSON 47\OCS 7 7 19 24 104
22 12 14851 JOEL HUMPHREY, MARK ALLEN & MOLLY HOPKINS 15 19 33 37 12 116
23 39 14739 JACK ELFMAN, CINDY LISTER-ELFMAN & MIKE HOLLY 23 39 21 20 13 116
24 18 15171 JOSHUA GOLDMAN, DEIRDRE CRAMPTON & DAN NEFF 28 29 15 32 20 124
25 37 14073 GARY HURBAN, DIEGO LEON & MICHELLE SUMPTON 12 24 22 35 36 129
26 29 15130 CHRISTOPHER VANN, BARBARA VANN & JAY VANN 14 31 32 10 48\OCS 135
27 2 14781 JUDY HANLON, BOB SENGSTACKEN & DAVID SCHMAHL 37 33 26 39 9 144
28 60 14960 MITCH HNATT, GINGER HNATT & RICK POKORNY 19 15 18 44 48\OCS 144
29 20 14111 BOB SHAPIRO, MARGO KRUKONIS & BRAD WINSLOW 34 26 37 25 22 144
30 34 14930 STEPHEN HORWITZ, BOB HARMAN & PAUL CALVET 33 43 35 31 10 152
31 9 11649 HECTOR LONGARELA, HUGO LONGARELA & TOMAS WAGMAISTER 33\ZFP 28 47\OCS 23 21 152
32 11 14374 JON EWING, EAMONN deLISSER & HEIDI deLISSER 32 25 28 36 31 152
33 26 15093 JOAN HURBAN, GARY SCHNEIDMAN & TIM MILLHISER 38 34 19 34 28 153
34 30 14975 PAUL WURTZEBACH, MONICA TREJO & JES WILLIS 25 36 47\OCS 29 17 154
35 46 14866 BILL MAUK, STUART deLISSER & SUZY BATZER 21 35 25 28 48\OCS 157
36 8 14905 DAVID GORMAN, CHANTAL LEGER & JAY DEAKIN 31 38 23 26 48\OCS 166
37 35 14854 RICHARD BUKOWSKY, JR, TRACI BUKOWSKY & ROBERT SHAW 36 41 40 22 33 172
38 16 14214 HUGH HUTCHISON, MARC VENABLES & DICK MOYER 39 40 27 42 26 174
39 10 15158 DAVID SPIRA, DAVE ADAMS & MARCEL WOLF 47\OCS 30 31 38 29 175
40 32 14801 MAURICIO VALENZUELA, ALBERTO VALENZUELA & TOMAS VALENZUELA 40 32 38 33 32 175
41 36 14275 JOHN HUGHES, KATE BRUSH & ANN BRUSH 22 44 34 30 48\OCS 178
42 41 15054 JONATHAN LANGE, PHILIP LANGE & KATHRYN HANSON 27 37 41 40 35 180
43 5 14396 KENNETH DEYETT, ADAM PHILBERT & GEOFFREY GIBBY 47\OCS 23 39 48\DNS 27 184
44 52 13861 RANDY CLEE, DAVE HOLLAND & ANDREA STRINGOS 30 42 30 41 48\OCS 191
45 13 14122 GEORGE KOCH, GEORGEANN KOCH & CHRIS WEEKS 42 45 36 45 34 202
46 47 14384 PATRICK GALLAGHER, BRUCE BROWN & NADINE LAVENDAR 35 47\DNF 47\DNS 43 48\OCS 220
47 38 13858 ROB MUIR 48\DNS 48\DNS 48\DNS 46 37 227

Day 1
March 11, 2003
By Richard Bukowsky



It was Monday night, the weather was warm, and the crew would be flying in tonight. Traci first, then Bob Shaw. Bob’s plane was scheduled just a little later that Traci’s, so we would hang out at the airport waiting for his. The boat was rigged, some last minute repairs completed earlier in the day. Then the phone calls started. Bob’s flight had been cancelled, and it was the last for the evening. He did manage to get on the first flight the next morning to arrive in Miami at 10:00 a.m. First race scheduled to start at 11:30 a.m., 1 hour drive from the airport, OK, we’re missing the first race. 

Tuesday morning brought another day of fair Florida Winter in Miami, 82 degrees, sunshine in the morning, and clouds in the afternoon with the threat of local showers. Traci and I woke early and went directly to the club to enjoy the wonderful breakfast they provided. The plan was for Traci to drop me to rig and launch the boat while she met Bob at the airport, and would drive him straight back. 

I was hanging out, waiting for everyone to launch and depart, then I would drop the boat in the water and wait for the crew. I kept waiting, and except for the early birds already in the water, everyone was in a holding pattern too. The winds were light, but there was wind. Finally boats began to launch, much later than I had expected. The last boat left the harbor at 10:45 a.m., the last boat except for us that is. Traci had already found Bob, and they were on there way, but traffic was heavy…

Bob and Traci made it just as I had finished launching and putting the trailer away. It was late, and Bob was anxious to get going, he still had aspirations of making the first race. So we paddled and we sailed, and we paddled and sailed. The fleet was across the bay, at the South East entrance to Biscayne Bay. Apparently that’s were the wind was, because it was pretty light were we where. As the 11:30 a.m. deadline approached we were still a mile from the fleet, with little hope of making it to the starting line before I time expired. But as 11:30 approached, things didn’t seem to get anymore organized. Boats were still working to weather, flying chutes, nothing indicated the organization of a start. When we finally arrived to the starting area, it was just in time for the RC to move the starting line ¼ mile to the east and south to adjust for a wind that was beginning to clock to the left, but it was also beginning to build. The promise of some great racing was looking better, and it looked like we had made it in time to race in all three race for the day. 

It would turn out to be one of those nasty days for the RC, as the wind just teased all day, building, then letting off, shifting 80 degrees and building again, and letting off, shifting back 60 degrees. 

The RC did a great job with the day. Race 1 finally started around 12:45 or 1:00 p.m. For us, we usually anchor the back of the pack, so the first start was a real surprise to us when we started well, kinda’ like the textbooks, where you are supposed to start in clear air and find a good lane. We sailed a nice first weather beat, staying in a freshening breeze the whole time. We were all afraid to say anything, but this is why we keep coming back, the hope of getting it right, and just doing better. So we rounded the weather mark in a pack of boats, and there were lots of boats behind us, this ain’t bad we thought. The first downwind went OK too. But at the end of the second upwind, there we were, we had been chewed up and spit out the back of the fleet again. 

Race 2 proceeded right after the downwind finish of Race 1. Just a little time to set up the course and we were back in the sequence. The first race was light winds, probably 6-10 variety. Race 2 was looking like it might be more exciting with winds building to 8-12. And there were plenty of shifts, and lots of velocity changes, so the game was on. This time we didn’t even get any teasing, we just got spit out the back right off the bat in this race. But the wind began to show signs of building again, and along with that, the wind went left some more. Way left. The RC adjusted well and started the second weather leg 100 degrees to the left of the first course. 

Race 2 finished, and RC began to get ready for Race 3. But the winds wouldn’t cooperate. The wind would shift, the RC would postpone, the wind would come back, then it would change, and the poor RC just kept struggling to get a race started. Finally, it looked pretty good, and the gun went off. I was toward the boat end, and as we were starting I suddenly saw the entire fleet flop over to port. Signally something significant was about to happen, we waited for the shift, flopped over to port, and realized we on the layline. The RC didn’t like the way things were shaping up, so a quick abandonment flag, and the race was over, and we would try again. 

RC was bound and determined to get Race 3 started. I figured we would be finishing in the dark, but they were dedicated in their effort to start the race, and that’s why we were all there. So they were finally successful in getting the third race off, and we were treated to a glorious sunset over Biscayne Bay as we sailed into the club. 

Day 1 at the Miami 2003 Lightning Mid Winters was now just a memory, but oh what a great memory!